Es-9 😵

ES-9

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What no midi DIN?! :triumph::triumph::triumph:

also $569 is quite resonable considering how much more IO it has. The extra HP is kinds of to be expected since many people were going the ES-6+ES-3 route. I like the Headphone jack and mains out, those are funtions that will make any modular into a true mini studio for a laptop user.

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Absolutely. the additional inputs and rendering a need for an additional output-dedicated module pointless. This would make multi-tracking your live sessions so incredibly easy!

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Not quite the same, but it reminded me that I meant to post this in case anyone might be looking for just CV out from Audulus. This module seems to be pretty affordable, but then again, you still need another interface for audio or CV back into the computer or iPad. Regardless it still seems like it might be pretty useful - Manikin USB - CV DAC Module

Edit: Affordable maybe isn’t the right word, cuz I thought I read $300 for it, not $400. I think just plain useful is more befitting of the module, with 8 DC coupled and 8 AC coupled outs :slightly_smiling_face:

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Wow and expandable with ES-5 - this is a beast!

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That’s a lot of bang for the buck.

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I’m surprised its not two times pricier than es-8)

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I definitely preordered this. I’d been going back and forth about an ES-8, and hoping it would be available to purchase at some point, and then this just popped up in my feed. Kismet! I’m curious, is it generally the hardware developer who makes the interface Audulus module, or members of the community?

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Welcome to the Forum. Glad to have you with us! :cowboy_hat_face:

The ES-9 is certainly impressive. It’s definitely on my wish list as well.
As far as interface modules are concerned, since both the ES-8 and ES-9 are audio interfaces, no special interface to Audulus is necessary. The MIDI in the ES-9 is also class compliment and requires no special drivers for macOS or iOS. At the most basic level you can treat them as you would any other audio interface with one important exception. Because they are DC coupled it is possible to send low frequency and static voltages through the interface. The ES-8 related modules posted on the forum are there to allow you to adjust the input to the ES-8 so that the resulting output voltages are properly scaled and offset for the hardware you’re connecting to. This is particularly useful for converting the 1 per octave pitch signal commonly used in Audulus to a volt per octave signal for use with Eurorack style hardware. Since there isn’t a common standard for the 0 reference in VPO and tracking varies a bit between manufacturers, the Audulus modules allow you to match Audulus output to your particular synth and correct for any variation in VPO tracking. It’s also sometimes necessary to scale or offset other CV signals. For example my Model D uses +/-5 volts for CV modulation but the ES-8 is capable of +/-10 volts so I scale the input from Audulus down to avoid exceeding the 5 volt limit. The ES-8 outputs are capable of producing an audio output that’s compatible with Eurorack but the level is a bit high for standard line level so audio gain also need to be adjusted at times. The ES-9 has a set of line level outputs so it shouldn’t be as necessary to adjust audio gain depending on your setup.

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Thank you, what a great clarification! The manual is what I’d call “good enough”, but I think I really just need to dive in once I get it. I’m so happy playing in Audulus by itself, so I’m really excited to integrate things fully, eq every hardware voice in ridiculously persnickety fashion, and record better sounding material.

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There is a way to go about all this where you don’t have to spend so much if you know what to buy in which order. I am mentioning this to anyone reading, because the question about an additional interface came up.

Audio interfaces are expensive. Sure, you can find a 2 channel. But then it starts to climb as the features come in. That is just to say, and it is too late for everyone I am sure: Don’t but an audio interface, buy an ES-8 or ES-9. That takes care of that financial problem. Then just don’t buy “beginner” or “entry” products and stay away from anything that is “a good deal.” You basically have to go about it like the kid who needs the real skateboard, not the sale board. You save your money. You take 3 or 4 years to fill out your whole plan.

Some people make some choice about spending thousands and thousands and all that. That’s fine. But it isn’t the only way to do it. Excited for you @Durdee. I am excited for the coming dormant season.

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The only issue with buying an ES-8 or 9 instead of a more typical audio interface is the lack of any mic or instrument inputs. If all you need is line-level connectivity then an ES-8 or 9 would be perfect, but they aren’t really designed for mics or instruments. Of course you could buy a separate DI box and mic pre but you might be getting close to the cost of a small unit from Focusrite or PreSonus.

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I’ve bought one Little Mikey, which I can’t say enough good things about, and I’ve got a second one on order because they’re already sold out everywhere. I’m somewhat of a preamp fanatic and these are great, and make things SO MUCH EASIER. I’ll probably whip up a 36HP lunchbox with the two LM’s and ES-9 with my uzeus, better than a mixer for my purposes!

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I really want to be clear here. I am a modular person through and through. I still remember the skateboard I ordered from California when I was a kid – part for part.

IMO we are past the point where guitar stuff matters anymore because there is just so god damn much of it.

Yeah. This is a good example of something that is a little higher end. I have two Pulp Logic CTACT 1U tiles for input/gain staging, and I find they are extremely useful for many different applications – just getting more juice out of things. But I also have my compressor pedal and a fuzz. So I have many options for gain. I imagine other people might have similar options, or buy a clean boost – build one off a circuit or get a cheap one. I mean, gain staging is an art form, not necessarily exhausted by expensive DI boxes and whatnot.

So with this modular approach it means you don’t have to buy something with all the trim. I think the CTACT’s are $20 US or something. The little mikey is $135 US.

So the idea is you get an ES-8 then you get some entry level extras. Then if you want a better input, you buy one. The nice thing is, there are alot of interesting options, because you now have a rack and an ES-8. I do a lot of guitar effect processing. I have alot of fun running things in various orders. So I have an analog compressor as well that I can throw on at the end, if it is not being used as a side-chain compressor. Again, the idea is not to be able to do everything at the same time. The idea is to have things broken down to the point that you can build what you want that day with patching. Then Audulus helps fill in the gaps. When you find something you want to get deeper into, you can just start hunting for a dedicated module.

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Good insights, for sure. I’m enjoying this forum quite a bit! I put together a couple of Music Thing Magnetophons which are really great for more than just tape heads. I use them often, but I have a lot of home built phantom powered microphones that I use in almost every patch in one way or another. I was using a Sound Devices Mixpre3, but it’s a little clunky for live patching purposes. So with the Little Mikey I find my workflow drastically reduced. it’s definitely got a premium price tag, but honestly with Euro module prices being what they are, the Expert Sleepers gear is priced pretty competitively. Anyway, happy patching, I feel like I’ve opened up another thread within this one, but y’all are great to chat with! I’ll start posting material up in the forum once I get my workflow down.

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CTACT are great for a piezo but won’t help for a guitar magnetic pickup or a mike that needs phantom power or is a regular dynamic. In addition to gain you have to consider the necessary input impedance and power requirements. The Little Mickey provides both phantom power and switchable impedance. It does have the advantage that it’s built into your rack but it’s in the same price range as a small interface with multiple mic and instrument inputs. I guess it all depends on your specific needs.

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This is sort of what I meant. You could get something to cover the basics. Or you can pick up something like this, if you have mic needs.

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Look like a nice mic preamp, although $200 seems a bit steep for something that only supports dynamic mics. While dynamic mikes are still probably the standard for vocals (and drums), condenser and ribbon mics pretty much dominate for everything else. Mics and mic preamps are one of those areas where it’s pretty hard to set a realistic divide between entry level and pro. A decent condenser mic ranges from $150 to $6000 and the same goes for mic preamps. Probably doesn’t make much sense to invest a bunch in either unless you have pretty good recording conditions. Without a studio or at least some pretty good room treatment, the room acoustics will probably be the dominant factor in any case. Of course my favorite vocal mic of all time is the Shure SM-58 dynamic cardioid mic which is still only $99. I was using one 45 years ago and they’re still really popular. As @futureaztec points out you don’t have to spend a fortune if you shop wisely.

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The source for most of mutable instruments modules is open as well

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Yes indeed it is, which is pretty awesome! Someone actually used it to make a pretty neat set of AU modules for iOS called the Spectrum Synthesizer Bundle and it is available for free, if I am not mistaken. I was messing with the modules in Garage Band, making a test track the other day, and they sounded so good, I ended up saving the track as a legit project I plan to put more work into later. Check them out if you haven’t already! :smiley:

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